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Thursday, September 22, 2005

Query Analyzer Trick

In Query Analyzer you can save a lot of time by using this trick instead of typing all the column names of a table
Hit F8, this will open Object Browser
Navigate to DatabaseName/TableName/Columns
Click on the column folder and drag the column folder into the Code Window
Upon release you will see that all the column names are in the Code Window

7 Comments:

Blogger Joe Muka said...

Hi, Nice site. My small site about low carb recipes is sometimes a pain to keep up with and needs work. Good job!

5:20 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Nice trick, I don't know why I didn't find out about it before.

11:35 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thats the best trick, ever!

6:17 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Maybe if Joe spent more time maintaining his site rather than promoting it in irritating ways, it wouldn't be such a pain for him to keep up with.

2:54 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thanks allot for that one ! :)

11:18 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Unfortunately it doesn't enclose the column names in square brackets, so when you have column names with spaces or special characters you have to manually correct them.

1:26 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Nice trick -- how does one find stuff like this. I had to write a stored procedure, but it is a little more flexible: you can add a string to the beginning of each column name.

set ANSI_NULLS ON
set QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[collist] @tab varchar(128), @heads varchar(128) = ''
as
declare @i as int
declare @tid as int
declare @nm as varchar(128)
declare @str varchar(8000)
select @tid = object_id(@tab)
if @tid is not null
begin
declare mc cursor for
select '[' + name + ']' from sys.syscolumns
where id = @tid
order by colorder
open mc
fetch next from mc into @nm
if datalength(@nm) > 0
select @str = @heads + @nm
fetch next from mc into @nm
while @@fetch_status <> -1
begin
if datalength(@nm) > 0
select @str = @str + ', ' + @heads + @nm
fetch next from mc into @nm
end
close mc
deallocate mc
select 'Columns' = @str
end

3:40 PM  

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